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Network Cabling Site Survey Check List

1 Information sources
Information for this document can be collected from the following sources:
· Customer’s representative
· Site survey
· Available documents and architectural drawings (see below)
· Local authorities, having jurisdiction
· Other subcontractors
2 Recommendations
· Never believe or assume, always check
· Collect all data from the customer in written form
· Use the latest version of your vendor’s Design Manual
· Use BICSI TDMM manual
· Use cabling standards

3 Customer Documentation
Request that the customer provides all or some of the following documents and drawings:
· Site plan
· Floor plans
· Elevation plans
· Roof plans
· Reflected ceiling plans with light fixture locations
· Power plans with possible EMI sources
· Outlet location plans
· Mechanical plan with HVAC duct locations
· Sprinkler plan with sprinkler pipe locations
3.1.1.1 Site plan
· Is it available?
· Does it contain property lines, building outlines, water and gas pipe lines, power lines
(aerial/buried/underground), trees, roads, other obstacles?

4 Applications Considerations
4.1.1 Horizontal Applications
· What services are to be provided to work areas (voice, data, video, other)?
· What are the requirements of each service per work area (number of copper pairs per
application, number of fibers per application)?
4.1.2 Intrabuilding Backbone Applications
· What services are to be supported by the backbone cabling (voice, data, video, other)?
· What are the requirements of each service (number of copper pairs per application,
number of fibers per application)?
4.1.3 Campus Applications
· What services are to be supported by the backbone cabling (voice, data, video, other)?
· What are the requirements of each service (number of copper pairs per application,
number of fibers per application)?

5 Architectural Considerations
· Equipment Room (ER)
· Telecommunications Closets (TC)
· Backbone Pathways
· Horizontal Pathways
· Entrance Facility
· Grounding and Bonding System
5.1 Equipment Room
5.1.1 Location
· Identify desirable ER location of the equipment room on the site plan
Size
· Height and width
· Usable floor space
· Usable wall space
· Ceiling height
· Power feeder location
5.1.2 Served Systems
· What equipment is to be placed in the equipment room?
· Identify type, size, weight and manufacturer’s installation requirements
5.1.2.1 Mounting of Connecting Hardware
· Identify the preferred method of mounting the connecting hardware (wall-mount, rackmount,
cabinets)
5.1.2.2 Mounting of Active Equipment
· Identify the preferred method of mounting the active equipment (wall-mount, rack-mount,
cabinets)
5.1.3 Approved Grounding
· Is it available?
· Mark location on the site plan
5.1.4 Means of bringing in heavy equipment available?
· Elevator rating
· Elevator door size
5.1.5 Floor-loading capacity
· Check that floor-loading capacity is adequate for heavy equipment which will be placed in
the equipment room.

5.1.6 Climate control system
· Is it available?
· What type (dedicated/non-dedicated)?
· Humidity control available?
· Temperature control available?
· Dust and contaminant control available?
· Is climate control system operation continuous?
5.1.7 Fire-extinguishing system
· Is it available?
· What type?
· Fire extinguishers available?
· If needed, consult local fire inspector
5.1.8 Firestopping
· Locate fire barriers, check their ratings
· Locate possible penetrations in fire barriers that may require firestopping
· If needed, consult local fire inspector
5.1.9 Lighting system
· Is it available?
· What capacity?
· Is it adequate?
· Is emergency lighting needed?
5.1.10 Possible EMI sources
· Location
· Type
· Mark EMI sources on the site plan
5.1.10.1 Possible hazards
· Locate any sources of water flooding, seepage, steam, heat, corrosive atmosphere
· Mark them on site plan
· Is the equipment room located above any threat of flooding?
5.1.11 Electric Power
· Number and location (mark on the equipment room plan)
· Is it adequate?
· Is power quality adequate for operating electronic equipment?
· Is emergency power system available?
· If needed, consult the electric power subcontractor
5.1.12 Plywood wall covering
· Is it available (in case of wall-mounting)?
· Is it void-free and fire-rated or coated with at least two coats of fire-resistant paint?
· How reliable is its mounting?

5.1.13 Access and proximity to entrance facility
· Locate entrance facility and determine distance and available pathways to the equipment
room
· Mark entrance facility location on the floor plan
5.1.14 Access to Backbone Pathways
· Identify and mark the location and size of backbone pathways on the equipment room plan
5.1.15 Space for internal cable pathways inside equipment room
· Is it available?
· What are customer preferences (cable trays, access floor)?
5.1.16 Dust and Static Electricity
· The floor surface must not produce dust and static electricity.
· What type of floor surface is present?
· Is it adequate?
5.1.17 Doors
· Is the door fully-opening or removable?
· Is the door lockable?
· What size (width, height)?
The size must be appropriate for bringing in the hardware and equipment.
5.1.18 Security
· What security means are available?
· What are customer requirements?
· Does any other building service pretend to share ER?

5.2 Telecommunication Closet
This step must be repeated for every telecommunications closet in the building.
5.2.1 Type and Location
· Identify and discuss possible location of the telecommunications closet on the floor plan
· Identify and discuss its type (cabinet/shallow closer/enclosed closet)
· Check if the telecommunications closet is accessible from a hallway or other common area
5.2.2 Floor Space Served
· Identify the usable floor space served by the telecommunications closet
· Identify the work areas served by the telecommunications closet
Size
· Length and width
· Usable floor space
· Usable wall space
· Ceiling height
5.2.3 Access to Backbone Pathways
· Identify and mark the location and size of backbone pathways on the telecommunications
closet plan
5.2.3.1 Mounting of Connecting Hardware
· Identify the preferred method of mounting the connecting hardware (wall-mount, rackmount,
cabinets)
5.2.3.2 Mounting of Active Equipment
· Identify the preferred method of mounting the active equipment (wall-mount, rack-mount,
cabinets)
5.2.4 Sharing with other services
· Check if equipment/hardware not related to the telecommunications and its support is
located or pass through the telecommunications closet. The telecommunications closet
may not be shared with services that interfere with telecommunications services.
5.2.5 Horizontal cable length
· Check if location of TC is within the limit of the allowed horizontal cable length
5.2.6 Doors
· Is the door fully-opening or removable?
· Is the door lockable?
· What size (width, height)?
The door size must be appropriate for bringing in the hardware and equipment.
5.2.7 Dust and Static Electricity
· The floor surface must not produce dust and static electricity.
· What type of floor surface is present?
5.2.7.1 Served Systems
· Will the telecommunications closet contain active equipment?
5.2.8 Floor-loading capacity
· Check that floor-loading capacity is adequate.
5.2.9 Future expansions
· Determine customer’s future expansion needs

5.3 Backbone Pathways
· Is it available?
· What type ? (sleeve, slot, conduit, cable racks)
· What size and quantity?
· Location?
· What is the total floor space served by backbone pathways?
· Are vertical shafts available?
· Are they vertically aligned?
· Are they connected to Equipment Rooms and Telecommunications Closets?
· What size and location ?
5.3.1 Firestopping
· Locate building fire barriers and check its ratings.

5.4 Horizontal Pathways
· Are they available?
· What type and size?
· If present, check the fill ratio. What cable is already placed in the pathways?
· Customer preferences?
· Determine the location of EMI sources in spatial relation to the horizontal pathways
· Determine the location of HVAC pathways in spatial relation to the horizontal pathways
· Determine the location of sprinkler pipes in spatial relation to the horizontal pathways
· Check side and top clearances of installed pathways

5.5 Entrance Facility
· Mark location on the floor plan
· Type (underground, buried, aerial)
· Locate the equipment room and determine distance and available pathways to the
entrance facility
· Check if a grounding busbar in the close proximity to entrance facility is available

5.6 Grounding and Bonding System
· Is a separate telecommunications grounding and bonding system available?
· If yes, is it compliant to TIA 607?

6 Horizontal Cabling Subsystem
This step must be repeated for each floor/Telecommunications Closet
· Determine usable floor space
· Determine number and location of Work Areas (mark on the site plan)
· Determine number, type (copper, fiber) and mounting of Telecommunications Outlets per
work area (mark on the site plan)
· Determine needed type of horizontal cable (copper, fiber)
· Determine cabling method (home-run, zone wiring)
· Mark the location of serving Telecommunications Closet

7 Building Backbone Cabling Subsystem
This step must be repeated for each Telecommunications Closet and for each type of backbone
cabling (copper voice; copper data; fiber data).
· Backbone cabling type (copper, fiber)
For copper cable: performance category, total number of pairs, number of pairs per cable
and number of cables
For fiber cable: total fiber count, type (multimode/single-mode), number of fibers per cable
and number of cables
· Number of work areas served by backbone
· Backbone redundancy needed?
· Backbone cabling pathways (see “Architectural Considerations”). Are they adequate?

Reasons Structured Cabling is Important for Business Phone Systems

Here are 5 reasons why structured cabling is essential for your business phone systems:

1. Faster transmission

When your team is on the phone waiting for an irate customer’s record to appear, every second can feel like an eternity. You’ll want to move data to the point of use as fast as you possibly can. Category 6A cable supports up to 10-Gigabits per second, while Category 5e supports 100 mbps. Most experts no longer recommend Category 3 for data transmission because of its slow speed and high volume of noise. Don’t slow down your business phone system and important data by using cables that won’t support the speed you need.

2. Less Noise

All twisted pair cable is susceptible to some degree of noise from nearby electronic equipment, but Category 5 is far superior to the older Category 3 at noise resistance. Category 5e, Category 6 and Category 6A each offers a big leap in noise reduction over its immediately preceding standard. Fiber optic cabling offers the best resistance to noise of any other cable system. Noise causes static and poor connections during phone conversations and corrupts data. Excessive noise slows down your network because the system has to resend corrupt data repeatedly until it gets through uncorrupted. It is a false economy to go with a lower quality cable, because you pay more in the hidden costs of slow response times and irritated customers.

3. Longer runs

The higher the quality of the cable that supports your business phone system, the longer the runs it can support without errors and artifacts creeping in. There are no restrictions on the length of fiber optic cable runs, and its superior noise resistance and speed make it an excellent choice for a business phone system or data center. Category 5 or category 6A wiring can support runs of up to 100 meters without noise, which gives you more flexibility in laying out your facility and reduces the number of repeaters or data hubs you’ll need to install. Eliminating hubs and repeaters as much as possible makes your network more reliable and reduces the investment in necessary equipment. Its reasonable cost coupled with the superior noise resistance over long runs makes Category 5e or Category 6A the cable of choice for Houston business phone systems.

4. Lower cost of maintenance

Fiber optic, Category 5e or Category 6 cables rarely go bad. On the rare occasion that they do, having a properly installed and carefully marked cable structure can make it faster to identify the problem and easier to replace the cable. Downtime equates to lost revenue, so you want to maximize uptime for your enterprise phone system in every way possible. In addition, instead of spending time tracing cables, your tech support or IT team can spend their time on more strategic initiatives than ensuring the integrity of your cables.

5. Position for growth

When they install NEC phone systems, Houston companies are making an investment in their future. By upgrading the structured cabling system that supports the digital phone system and the company’s data at the same time, these companies position themselves for growth with infrastructure that supports fast, error free transmission of voice and data. Houston business phone systems supported by fiber optic cables or the highest possible category of cable provide companies with superior speeds and voice quality that helps the company compete better in their industry. Better quality cabling is a better investment, because it will serve the company well for far longer than cheaper cabling, and it will be far less troublesome during its entire useful life.

Companies should install the best and most up-to-date data cabling they can afford to ensure that they get top performance from their digital phone system. Good quality cabling can reduce maintenance costs, increase data transmission speeds and improve voice quality.

Reference: http://www.ttihouston.com/blog/bid/324395/5-Reasons-Structured-Cabling-is-Important-for-Business-Phone-Systems

Cat5 vs Cat5e vs Cat6 – Which Should You Use?

Cat5 vs Cat5e

  • Network support – CAT 5 cable will support 10BASE-T and 100BASE-T network standards, that is it supports networks running at 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps.  CAT 5e is an enhanced version of Cat5 that adds specifications for crosstalk (see below). Cat5e cable is completely backwards compatible with Cat5, and can be used in any application in which you would normally use Cat5 cable. However, the added specifications of Cat5e enable it to support Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T), or networks running at 1000 Mbps.
  • Crosstalk – Crosstalk is the “bleeding” of signals between one cable into another, due to a process called induction. This effect can result in slow network transfer speeds, and can even completely block the transfer of signals over the cable. Cat5e cable has been improved over Cat5 cable in this respect, and crosstalk has been greatly reduced.
  • Bandwidth – The bandwidth of a given conveyance media is essentially it’s information carrying capacity. The greater the bandwidth of a system, the faster it is able to push data across a network. Cat5 is rated at 100Mhz while Cat5e is rated at 350Mhz. This coupled with other more stringent specifications makes Cat5e ideally suited for networks which plan to operate at Gigabit Ethernet speeds.
  • Bottom Line: If you plan on to implement Gigabit Ethernet, go with Cat5e. Also, the small increase in price of Cat5e over Cat5 is more than made up for by “future proofing” your network’s cabling infrastructure.


Cat5e vs Cat6

There is a great deal of debate among people about whether new cabling installations should use Cat5e or Cat6. Many people incorrectly assume that by running Cat6 they will then have a Gigabit Ethernet. However, in order to achieve true Gigabit Ethernet speeds, every single component on a network must be gigabit rated, such as the switches, hubs and network interface cards. This isn’t to say that there aren’t differences between Cat5e and Cat6, however. The general difference between category 5e and category 6 is in the transmission performance. While Cat5e can support gigabit speeds, Cat6 is certified to handle gigabit Ethernet. Additionally, the Cat6 specification is better suited toward environments that are generally unfriendly to twisted pair cabling. This includes areas that have lots of interference from things like power lines, lights, and manufacturing equipment. Still, for most applications, Cat5e is perfectly suitable and preferable to Cat6: it is more economical and performs almost as well. However, if you can be certain that all the components on your network are gigabit rated, and the volume of the data being transmitted calls for certified gigabit performance, then Cat6 is the way to go.

 

reference: www.networkcablingdirectory.com/articles/structured-network-cabling-id_1151.htm